Welcome from Undergraduate Student Editors

Expansions Vol 4

A message from the undergraduate student editors of this issue of Expansions.

Share

To readers, and the wonderful faculty, staff, and students of the School of Education:

We present to you this year’s publication of the Expansions newsletter brought to you by the Office for Diversity, Inclusion, Justice, and Equity (dije) here in the School of Education (SOE).

Mariah Benford

Within this year’s edition, we wanted to highlight what has been the focus of our office over the past year: Healing, liberation, and anti-racism. We’ve hosted many events and programs that surround our goals, and we’ve also felt the need to acknowledge others within the SOE community who have been doing work towards these goals or have even made them their own.

We hope that as you read this issue, you are not only inspired by the many leaders within the SOE community but also willing to be reflective of yourself and how you chose to engage the communities around you.

Our hearts go out to those who may have experienced any form of loss within the last year. We want to acknowledge that COVID-19 (“the Coronavirus”) has impacted our lives in more ways than one and that the transitions that many of us had to navigate were tough. We want to highlight the journey to achieving healing that we all cycle through at points in our lives, and how while it may be difficult, we’re in the process right now, and we are still blessed to see another day. We wanted this edition of Expansions to be just as amazing as YOU, and we’re glad to know that we had the privilege and pleasure of serving the SOE community one last time through the efforts going into this publication.

Brianna Morigney

The following ethics drive the work of the dije Office: love, trust, authenticity, and responsibility. Self-love is a prerequisite for individual and collective liberation. Therefore, we have a humanizing agenda that values truth-telling, respects boundaries, and prioritizes grace and care. Our work comes from a sacred ancestral rhythm guided by trust. We share a disposition of humility, a willingness to unlearn, an acceptance of thoughts in process, and each other with our vulnerability. Showing up as our true selves while acknowledging that our selves contain the witness of our ancestors and the historical situations in which we were raised. Lastly, our work must name, be easily understood by, and accountable to the groups we endeavor to serve. We make it clear that our work must center the following folx: Black (African American/Black), Latinx,  Indigenous, international students, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islander folx, queer, trans, non-binary, folx with disabilities, working class/poor, religious minorities, and any other historically minoritized group.

We hope that our ethics were embodied in the work we’ve done this year, while also realizing that the real work is never finished. To the next generation of leaders, we thank you for your passion, grace, and love for others! We hope you enjoy reading this year’s edition of Expansions.

Sincerely,

 

Mariah Benford signature

Mariah C. Benford
LSA Sociology & Social Work (‘21)
dije Intern, Fall 2020 & Winter 2021
University of Michigan

 

Brianna R. Morigney signature

Brianna R. Morigney
LSA Political Science (‘21)
dije Intern, Fall 2021 & Winter 2021
University of Michigan

MORE FROM Expansions Vol 4

Expansions Vol 4
For this issue of Expansions, we were able to sit down with two of our new faculty members, Drs. Charles Davis and Rosemary (Rosie) Perez, and discuss their research and this year's theme for Expansions, “Healing, Liberation, and Anti-Racism in the Age of the COVID-19 Pandemic.”
Expansions Vol 4
For this issue of Expansions, we were able to sit down with two of our new faculty members, Drs. Charles Davis and Rosemary (Rosie) Perez, and discuss their research and this year's theme for Expansions, “Healing, Liberation, and Anti-Racism in the Age of the COVID-19 Pandemic.”
Expansions Vol 4
The dije Office hosted a variety of community conversations. dije Community Conversations are times when all members of the School of Education (SOE) community are invited to come together to address issues affecting members of our community, to learn from and with each other, and to promote values of dije in the School of Education.
Expansions Vol 4
To celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day, the dije office invited Indigenous scholars for a panel discussion about centering Indigenous epistemologies and life-worlds in the field of education.
Expansions Vol 4
The dije partners with the Spectrum Center at the University of Michigan to discuss how the School of Education can think deeper to create inclusive spaces for those in the LGBTQ+ communities.
Expansions Vol 4
In February, the dije office hosted its annual Black Lives Matter Week of Action to organize for racial justice in education through a series of virtual events.
Expansions Vol 4
At TeachingWorks, we are committed to the power of teaching to disrupt injustice. This requires that teachers learn to teach complex content and practices in culturally responsive ways and build classroom communities to advance justice.
Expansions Vol 4
The dije Office and the Race and Justice Institute asks that you mark your calendars for our upcoming Inaugural Antiracism Colloquium for the week of May 10–14.
Expansions Vol 4
The dije office is committed to using a Universal Design for Learning framework to further our mission of advancing diversity, inclusion, justice and equity within the School of Education.

The School of Education is proud to be a leader in the campus-wide initiative promoting Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity. Adding "Justice" to these values underscores the role of educators in the creation of just societies. Through research, public scholarship, community building, and the preparation of education practitioners and policymakers, we articulate and advance our dije agenda.