Programming: Community Conversations

The dije Office hosted a variety of community conversations. dije Community Conversations are times when all members of the School of Education (SOE) community are invited to come together to address issues affecting members of our community, to learn from and with each other, and to promote values of dije in the School of Education.

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A dije Community Conversation on Healing and Liberation from Racism with Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis

Portrait of Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis
Thema Bryant-Davis

On September 17th, 2020, the dije Office invited Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis to lead a community conversion on Healing and Liberation from Racism. Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis is a licensed psychologist, professor of psychology at Pepperdine University, and director of the Culture and Trauma Research Lab. She is a past psychology representative to the United Nations and a past president of the Society for the Psychology of Women. Dr. Bryant-Davis has published and presented on the societal trauma of racism.

During the community conversation, Dr. Bryant-Davis discussed the psychological effects of trauma and racism. The key themes that emerged from the discussion were racial trauma, healing, liberation, Black Women, mental health, and the superwoman syndrome. We would love to have Dr. Bryant Davis back for future events because she was magnificent.


“There is Nothing Fragile About Racism:” A Community Conversation on Decentering Whiteness with Dr. David Humphrey & Dr. Maren Oberman

On November 20th, 2020, dije’s own Dr. David Humphrey and Dr. Maren Oberman led a community conversation entitled “There is Nothing Fragile About Racism: A Community Conversation on Decentering Whiteness with Dr. David Humphrey & Dr. Maren Oberman.” The conversation focused on racism at the systemic and personal levels, and key strategies to reckon with the manifestation of White Supremacy in our own institution. During the conversation, participants broke out into affinity groups to discuss ways in which identity groups can dismantle white supremacy. Overall, the workshop encouraged participants to understand their own whiteness, positionality, and identity, as well as to develop knowledge about how to decenter whiteness on an institutional level.


WHAT THE BODY REMEMBERS: A dije Post-Election Community Conversation on Healing and Liberation

Portrait of Dr. Maria Abegunde
Maria Hamilton Abegunde

On November 4th, 2020, the dije Office invited Dr. Maria Hamilton Abegunde to host a healing space and community conversation entitled “WHAT THE BODY REMEMBERS: A dije Post-Election Community Conversation on Healing and Liberation.” Dr. Abegunde is founding Director of The Graduate Mentoring Center and Visiting Lecturer, Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington. Her research is grounded in contemplative practices and respectfully approaches the Earth and human bodies as sites of memory, and always with the understanding that memory never dies, is subversive, and can be recovered to transform transgenerational trauma and pain into peace and power. During the conversation, Dr. Abegunde explored notions of care during difficult times, addressing racial trauma and creating and sustaining personal and community practice. Dr. Abegunde’s words allowed SOE community members to breathe, pause, and listen in a stressful time.

MORE FROM Expansions Vol 4

Expansions Vol 4
A message from the undergraduate student editors of this issue of Expansions.
Expansions Vol 4
For this issue of Expansions, we were able to sit down with two of our new faculty members, Drs. Charles Davis and Rosemary (Rosie) Perez, and discuss their research and this year's theme for Expansions, “Healing, Liberation, and Anti-Racism in the Age of the COVID-19 Pandemic.”
Expansions Vol 4
For this issue of Expansions, we were able to sit down with two of our new faculty members, Drs. Charles Davis and Rosemary (Rosie) Perez, and discuss their research and this year's theme for Expansions, “Healing, Liberation, and Anti-Racism in the Age of the COVID-19 Pandemic.”
Expansions Vol 4
To celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day, the dije office invited Indigenous scholars for a panel discussion about centering Indigenous epistemologies and life-worlds in the field of education.
Expansions Vol 4
The dije partners with the Spectrum Center at the University of Michigan to discuss how the School of Education can think deeper to create inclusive spaces for those in the LGBTQ+ communities.
Expansions Vol 4
In February, the dije office hosted its annual Black Lives Matter Week of Action to organize for racial justice in education through a series of virtual events.
Expansions Vol 4
At TeachingWorks, we are committed to the power of teaching to disrupt injustice. This requires that teachers learn to teach complex content and practices in culturally responsive ways and build classroom communities to advance justice.
Expansions Vol 4
The dije Office and the Race and Justice Institute asks that you mark your calendars for our upcoming Inaugural Antiracism Colloquium for the week of May 10–14.
Expansions Vol 4
The dije office is committed to using a Universal Design for Learning framework to further our mission of advancing diversity, inclusion, justice and equity within the School of Education.

The School of Education is proud to be a leader in the campus-wide initiative promoting Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity. Adding "Justice" to these values underscores the role of educators in the creation of just societies. Through research, public scholarship, community building, and the preparation of education practitioners and policymakers, we articulate and advance our dije agenda.